Nicole Godbold. 

info
×

Grace James. 

info
×

Lynton Williams.

info
×

Otto Lyons.

info
×

Jack Blurton. 

info
×

"Blinding Decoys" is an exploration of the merging realms of photography and art, and challenges the commonly accepted idea that 'photography is dead'. 


In 1859, the French poet Charles Baudelaire raged in print when he saw photographs displayed in the Grand Salon of Paris, where painting once reigned. Nothing provoked Baudelaire or his allies more than the notion that the painter and the photographer were equals – that both of them practiced, in brief, a fine, high art. On this ground, he was not and is not alone. Even now, when photography is not only widely practiced, but widely admired, collected and exhibited, the dispute goes on. At the close of his attack, Baudelaire conceded photography only one legitimate function; recording what might otherwise be lost to the human eye or memory.

Now of course, photography has refused anything of that kind. Far from keeping to its humble place, merely recording for the archives of art and sciences, photography has literally reshaped and reinvented the world. The medium has developed, and is still developing, so much that lines have become blurry. 


Photography is Art, and even if one would wish to disagree, photography is now reinventing itself into a mix between the two: mixed-media photography.


Mixing media and image transfer, two methods that are often done independently, is probably the ultimate union and can generate some exciting results. This phenomenon can be seen more and more in the (fashion) photography industry and one could argue 'photography' is not merely about the production process anymore; has post-production taken over? And if so, what does it now mean to be ‘a photographer?’ Would one be right to still call himself or herself merely a ‘photographer’? Or would one be closer to an ‘artist’, a ‘painter’ or within the fashion industry more something of an ‘art-director’?


Blinding Decoys” explores this phenomenon through a series of five portraits.  

Using Format